Rep. Roman urged: “Educate the youth on HIV”

Rep. Roman urged: “Educate the youth on HIV”

Rep. Roman urged: “Educate the youth on HIV”

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ORANI, Bataan – Bataan First District Congresswoman on Wednesday urged everyone to educate the youth concerning the alarming rise of HIV cases in the country.
“We have to educate our youth on HIV. Thousands of youth are reported to be infected with HIV last year. How many more were and still are unreported?,” Roman lamented.
Latest data from Philippines’ Department of Health reported that 3,110 Filipino youth aged 15 to 24 years were diagnosed with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from January to November 2018.
“The children are our country’s hope. It is saddening to note that among the different age brackets, it is those aged 15-24 who are mostly affected in terms of HIV infection. It is now being termed as an epidemic amongst the Filipino youth. We should not allow this to continue,” Roman added.
The first-termer solon also calls out on all parents, schools and communities to spread awareness of this problem.
“We need to act now. As for the young people, as well as adults, infected with HIV, let us give them our all-out support. We need to show them all our love and provide them with the necessary health care,” Roman said.
Published articles stated that HIV is a virus that attacks cells in the immune system, which is our body’s natural defence against illness. The virus destroys a type of white blood cell in the immune system called a T-helper cell, and makes copies of itself inside these cells. T-helper cells are also referred to as CD4 cells.
As HIV destroys more CD4 cells and makes more copies of itself, it gradually weakens a person’s immune system. This means that someone who has HIV, and isn’t taking antiretroviral treatment, will find it harder and harder to fight off infections and diseases.
If HIV is left untreated, it may take up to 10 or 15 years for the immune system to be so severely damaged that it can no longer defend itself at all. However, the rate at which HIV progresses varies depending on age, general health and background.
People with HIV based on published medical records, can enjoy a long and healthy life by taking antiretroviral treatment which is effective and available to all.
Once a person has HIV, the earlier they are diagnosed, the sooner they can start treatment which means they will enjoy better health in the long term.
It’s possible for antiretroviral treatment to reduce the level of HIV in the body to such low levels that blood tests cannot detect it. People living with HIV whose viral load is confirmed as undetectable cannot pass on HIV.
Regular testing for HIV is important to know your status.
HIV is found in semen, blood, vaginal and anal fluids, and breastmilk.
HIV can’t be transmitted through sweat, saliva or urine.
Using external (or male) condoms or internal (or female) condoms during sex is the best way to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.
If you inject drugs, always use a clean needle and syringe, and never share equipment.
If you’re pregnant and living with HIV, the virus in your blood could pass into your baby’s body, during birth or afterwards through breastfeeding. Taking HIV treatment and becoming undetectable eliminates this risk.
Meanwhile, AIDS (or the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is a set of symptoms, or syndrome as opposed to a virus, caused by HIV. A person is said to have AIDS when their immune system is too weak to fight off infection, and they develop certain defining symptoms and illnesses. This is the last stage of HIV, when the infection is very advanced, and if left untreated will lead to death.

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